Ilsington Village

Parish Tour Events Clubs Churches P.Council History Services Days Out

The village of Ilsington is relatively small and is built around its church and churchyard.  In earlier years it was known as "Church Town" or simply "Town" - the old road towards Liverton is still called "Old Town Hill". It was largely self-supporting, the inhabitants including farmers, butchers, bakers, tailors, miners, millers, weavers, blacksmiths, carpenters, shoemakers, masons, quarrymen, cordwainers, thatchers, charcoal burners etc. 
The present church was mainly built towards the end of the 15th century. The remains of the ancient Manor House stand in the north-east corner of the churchyard. 
The west lychgate is in the form of a building which was once used as a school.  On Tuesday 17th September 1639, a woman slamming the heavy oak gate caused the whole building to collapse, Four boys fell into the churchyard, one into the street and the rest were buried in the rubble. Fortunately none were seriously unjured.  The building was reconstructed to a design by T.H.Lyon of Middlecott in 1910. 
One problem was that Ilsington did not have a spring for water.  A potwater leat ran down from Haytor but it got very polluted at times. Villagers collected their water from granite or wooden chutes. Those that did not have their own well had to carry clean water uphill from a spring in a field on the way to Simms Hill or from the brook at Narracombe.  It was not until 1914 that a piped water supply was  provided from a new reservoir near the Haytor quarries.
The Carpenters Arms is thought to have been a farmhouse and became a public house about 1816.

Just down the valley, towards Liverton, are the remains of the Silverbrook Mine which was worked from 1851 until 1858 for Lead and Zinc.
The Devon Mining Club website, http://www.devon-mining-club.org.uk has further information about mining in this area.

 

 

 

Parish Tour Events Clubs Churches P.Council History Services Days Out